Reading and Thinking Football

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Tennessee Titans 2017 Draft Preview by Position

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The latest in a series of occasional posts about the Tennessee Titans, posted here because I no longer maintain a separate Titans blog. “What I’ve been reading” coming after the end of April.

One of the staples of my pre-draft coverage for years has been a draft preview by position, including probabilities of selecting a player at each position. Especially because this will be my only pre-draft post, I will also note players the Titans have been linked to with a reported visit or private workout (via Titans Report compilation).

Mandatory mention for this post: the Titans currently hold 8 picks in the 2016 NFL draft. To be as realistic as possible, I wanted the sum of the draft probabilities at each position to add up to 7.0. If the probability at any particular position looks too high to you, well, it probably looks too high to me as well. But to get the total to 7.0, the probabilities all look too high. I know, 7.0 is still short of 8, but (a) it wouldn’t surprise me to see the Titans end up making seven selections by making a trade or two, and (b) the sixth and seventh rounds are prime spots for value- and UDFA-related picks where positional need matters much less, so they’re ripe for doubling up on a need position (like Kalan Reed last year) or picking a non-need slot (the David Howard pick a few years ago). If things go true to form, the Titans will hit all but one of the positions I have them rated as highly likely to draft while hitting one of the positions I think it much less likely they will draft.

I should note that, as much as I can, this post attempts to describe what the Titans might think based on how I think the Titans might think. Jon Robinson and Mike Mularkey will be setting the direction and making the decisions for the team, so I try to think how they would think. What I would do if I ran the Titans is (a) in some cases quite different and (b) completely irrelevant in terms of predicting what the Titans will do.

Quarterback
Need at position: Low
Analysis: Marcus Mariota is the starter. Matt Cassel is the trusted veteran backup. Alex Tanney is the third quarterback. What you may think of Cassel as a backup is irrelevant; the Titans seem to value him a lot, so he will be there. Though Tanney was on the roster Week 1 last year, I do not believe the Titans will look to keep a third quarterback. I will interpret any early quarterback pick as a sign that Mariota’s injury may be much more severe than we believe it to be. Possible late, but I doubt it.
Draft probability: 10%
Linked players: Josh Dobbs

Running Back
Need at position: Moderate-low
Analysis: The Titans did not tender RFA RB3 Antonio Andrews, and did not add a veteran, so they may have a need at the position. But last year they kept DeMarco Murray and Derrick Henry and cut Dexter McCluster, and Andrews had almost no role on offense (9 snaps). That surprised me because Mike Mularkey had had a pass game back/satellite player on his team. They could look to add one of those, a more all-around back, or a grinder. Or just roll with Murray, Henry, and maybe dive into the UDFA market and perhaps not even keep a third RB. I think they’ll draft a back, but I do not see it as a priority.
Draft probability: 60%
Linked players: Kareem Hunt, Marlon Mack

Wide Receiver
Need at position: High
Analysis: The Titans’ top four at wide receiver is currently Rishard Matthews, Tajae Sharpe, and Harry Douglas. The more perspicacious of you will note that list has three names on it. Yes, the Titans do currently have more than three receivers on the roster, but that’s the way I think they think of it. I went in depth on the Titans and their potential needs at receiver in February. Since then, they lost who I thought they would lose and have not added anybody, so what I wrote there is still largely true. The Titans could, and probably will, look to draft two receivers: an X to replace Sharpe, probably early, and a slot-type, probably in the middle rounds. I am not as convinced as other people seem to be that plus speed will be a priority, which in practical terms means I think Mike Williams at #5 is much more likely than other people think.
Draft probability: 100% of one, 60% of a second
Linked players: Kendrick Bourne, B.J. Bunn, Corey Davis, Chris Godwin, Zay Jones, John Ross, Da’Morea Stringfellow, Noel Thomas, Mike Williams, DeAngelo Yancey

Tight End
Need at position: High
Analysis: I also covered tight ends in that February post, including why I did not believe (and still do not believe) the Titans are likely to be interested in spending a high pick on either O.J. Howard or David Njoku. But they did lose Anthony Fasano, so the primary blocking tight end role is still open. Phillip Supernaw could help fill that void, as could playing an extra offensive lineman like Dennis Kelly or Tim Lelito. With this year regarded as one of the best tight end classes in history, however, the Titans are nearly certain to draft a tight end. I expect a competent in-line blocker in the middle rounds.
Draft probability: 99%
Linked players: O.J. Howard, David Njoku, Adam Shaheen, Jonnu Smith

Offensive Tackle
Need at position: Low
Analysis: Set at starter with two young players in Taylor Lewan and Jack Conklin. Set at backup with Dennis Kelly. Mularkey has carried nine offensive linemen before, and I feel like developmental tackles the way other people feel about developmental quarterbacks, so it could happen. But probably not, not with this tackle class, and not with seemingly everybody else looking for a starter.
Draft probability: 10%
Linked players: Corey Levin, Brad Seaton, Darrell Williams

Offensive Guard/Center
Need at position: Moderate
Analysis: The Titans are set at center with Ben Jones and at gameday swing backup with Lelito. Quinton Spain should hold down one guard spot. Josh Kline returns at the other one, and Sebastian Tretola could challenge him. But Kline was a waiver wire pickup, and Tretola is a sixth-round pick who played 3 snaps. We do not really know just how much the Titans like either player. And they’re keeping 5 interior players, likely, so they could add competition for those two. I’m not sure how their need for an immediate starter fits with the weakness of this line class, though. If Forrest Lamp at #18 is the only hope for a 2017 upgrade on Kline/Tretola barring The Magical Trade-Back Fairy giving them a second-round pick, then they may not draft one at all.
Draft probability: 50%
Linked players: Jordan Morgan, Chase Roullier

Defensive Line
Need at position: Low
Analysis: The Titans regularly dress five defensive linemen. They have on their roster Jurrell Casey (paid a lot, very good), DaQuan Jones (played a lot in 2016, generally well regarded for what he is), Sylvester Williams (whom they signed to a bigger contract than I thought he’d get in free agency), Karl Klug (re-signed early in free agency notwithstanding an injury that may leave him on the shelf until training camp), and Austin Johnson (second-round pick last year). That does not include Angelo Blackson (fourth-round pick a couple years ago), or Anquan Woods or Mehdi Abdesmad (UDFA they liked last year, who spent most of the season on the practice squad and were signed late on the roster). I do not believe the Titans will draft a defensive lineman at all unless they see him as an exceptional value relative to the draft slot and a clear upgrade on a player they have.
Draft probability: 10%
Linked players: Jonathan Allen, Davion Belk, Rod Henderson, Grover Stewart

Outside Linebacker
Need at position: Moderate-low?
Analysis: They’re set at starter with Brian Orakpo and Derrick Morgan. The questions I have are behind them. To create a decent rotation, you need backups to play 550 spots. Pencil in Aaron Wallace for 10 snaps a game, so are they comfortable counting on Kevin Dodd for 400 snaps, more if Morgan or Orakpo is on the shelf again? I would not be, but nor would I have taken Dodd anywhere close to where the Titans did. Their interest in Erik Walden suggests they may not be absolutely comfortable, especially given Mularkey mentioned at the pre-draft presser Dodd was still not completely healthy, and I still believe this is a position they could look to add a player, even with a high pick. As I’ve considered things more, though, I’ve come to see this as a less of a priority and more of a like to draft, if the right player is there at the right value.
Draft probability: 60%
Linked players: Derek Barnett, Keionta Davis (DL?), Charles Harris, Steven Rhodes

Inside Linebacker
Need at position: Moderate-high
Analysis: Pretty simple here. Sean Spence played a lot in coverage situations for the Titans in 2016. The Titans did not re-sign Sean Spence. There is no replacement for him on the roster. The Titans are therefore very likely interested in adding a cover linebacker in the draft, and potentially interested in adding a three-down linebacker if there is one available they like. I can’t see it happening at #5, but a possibility for any subsequent pick. But they could probably get by with Avery Williamson, Wesley Woodyard, and some Big Nickel and dime if they had to.
Draft probability: 82%
Linked players: Jordan Evans, Reuben Foster, Haason Reddick, Jaylon Reeves-Maybin, Duke Riley

Cornerback
Need at position: High
Analysis: The Titans are drafting at least one cornerback, and could draft more than one like they did last year. The biggest question is, just how high? I keep going back to that Dick LeBeau has been a defensive coordinator or head coach in the NFL more than 25 years, and his teams have never, ever, not once spent a first-round pick on a cornerback, and I’ll keep repeating that until I see somebody I haven’t talked to mention that. I cannot completely rule it out in the first round, after the Titans played so much man coverage last year, but with the depth of the class I see it as likely a third-round priority.
Draft probability: 99%
Linked players: Jamal Agnew, Chidobe Awuzie, Gareon Conley, Jeremy Cutrer, Corn Elder, Randall Goforth, Adoree Jackson, Marshon Lattimore, Obi Melifonwu (S?), Cam Sutton

Safety
Need at position: Moderate-low?
Analysis: At safety, the Titans have (a) Kevin Byard, about whom they have said nothing but good things since drafting him in the third round last year, (b) Johnathan Cyprien, whom they gave a big free agent contract to this offseason, (c) Da’Norris Searcy, a natural SS who played some single high last year and therefore could easily fill in as either Byard or Cyprien’s backup, and (d) Brynden Trawick, a special teams player whose work on defense GM Jon Robinson praised after signing him this offseason. Against this, you have (1) months of Jamal Adams being mocked to the Titans at #5, both before and after Cyprien’s signing, and (2) Mike Mularkey’s comment in March about the Titans liking their safety rotation. It’s a good safety class, so it could happen. But I don’t see it as nearly as likely or as much of a priority for them as most draftniks and fans seem to think it is.
Draft probability: 60%
Linked players: Jamal Adams (maybe), Josh Jones, Leon McQuay

Some Macro-Level Thoughts
I inadvertently gave my best summary of the Titans’ approach to the draft last year in a single tweet noting their 2016 needs. My top need was OT; their first pick was OT. My second need was OLB; their second pick was OLB. By third need was DL; their third pick was DL. I grouped needs 4-6 together (S, RB, CB); those ended up being their 5th, 4th, and 7th picks. WR would have been my seventh need, had I listed one; it was their sixth pick. Based on one year of data, the Titans appear to be an extremely needs-focused drafting team. Applying this same rubric to 2017, where’s what it suggests:

A. WR will be a first-round pick;
B. CB is a strong contender for a first-round pick; and
C. TE is a bit tricky-a strong need, but their need is for a blocker rather than a receiver or all-around player, which means it is does not need to be a first-round priority.

Whether they take G, ILB, S, RB, OLB, or second WR, and in what order, will likely be a function of board and value rather than based on need priority. This is not to say the Titans cannot prioritize different things than I think they prioritize and select a player I do not see as a priority need with a high pick, like a Jonathan Allen or Jamal Adams at #5. As noted above, I am trying to think like I think J-Rob and Mularkey think, but I only know or can guess so much about what they believe, and they may believe things I do not know, think, or guess they believe. Any pick at #5 other than a WR will tell us something, but my guess is the real answers we get from Tennessee start at #18.

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Written by Tom Gower

April 25, 2017 at 14:30

Posted in Tennessee Titans

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